Articles Tagged with Bankruptcy Lawyer

The protection available to you when you file bankruptcy is immediate and automatic.  The moment you file, whether it is a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13 bankruptcy case, the court places you under it’s protection. Both your income and property are completely sheltered from any creditor seeking to repossess, foreclose, garnish, or seize them. The court refers to this as “The Automatic Stay”.  Any and all collection attempts against your income or your property must stop.  If a lawsuit has been filed, it must cease. If a judgment has been issued and a subsequent Writ of Garnishment has gone out, it must cease.  If the repossession order has gone out, efforts must cease.  If the foreclosure date has been set, it must cease.  Also, creditors must stop calling you, sending you letters, calling your family, etc.  The Automatic Stay is known as “the protection that halts any and all creditor collection activity”.  For more reasons why you may not want to wait, click here.   Bankruptcy was created to protect you, your income, your family, and Continue reading

Cheap Lawyers are everywhere, but you may not be able to afford them.

You can see a lot of lawyers bragging about being the cheapest. Search on the web and you will see ads for “Cheap Bankruptcy Attorney,” “Low Fee Bankruptcy.”

We all know that quality and cheap don’t go together. If we buy cheap we know it will cost us more in the long run. You get what you pay for. This is no surprise. We expect it and make buying decisions knowing what will happen. When it comes to hiring a lawyer, hiring the cheapest is not the way to go. The risks are just too great.

No. If you have been convicted of a crime you can still file bankruptcy. The bankruptcy papers don’t ask you questions like that. A criminal record would only be an issue if you were trying to file bankruptcy to get rid of fines or restitution. You can’t wipe out court fines and criminal restitution in bankruptcy. However, a chapter 13 bankruptcy would allow you to make your restitution payments over a 60 month period if you were having trouble making the payments ordered by the court that convicted you.